Financing FAQ

McArthur Homes

Your Top 5 Financing Questions Answered

Thinking about purchasing a new home, but unsure about the financing process? Scott Smith of Bank of American Fork answers several of your FAQ including:

  • How do I apply for a home loan?
  • What do I need to apply for a loan?
  • How long will it take to get approved?
  • How are interest rates determined?
  • What is the difference between “locking” and “floating” an interest rate?

Wondering how much home you can afford? Request a Free Consultation today.

More Financing FAQ

Here are the answers to more Frequently Asked Questions regarding new home financing by Pierre Alley of Utah Mortgage.

  • What is the difference between pre-approval and pre-qualification?
  • What is a rate lock?
  • What is the difference between a mortgage broker and a lender?
  • Will I save money going straight to a mortgage lender?
  • What is a full documented loan?
  • What are other types of loans?
  • What is a good faith estimate?
  • What are points?
  • What is a pre-qualification?

What is the difference between pre-approval and pre-qualification?

The pre-approval process is much more complete than pre-qualification. For pre-qualification, the loan officer asks you a few questions and provides you with a pre-qual letter. Pre-approval includes all the steps of a full approval, except for the appraisal and title search.

What is a rate lock?

A rate lock is a contractual agreement between the lender and buyer. There are four components to a rate lock: loan program, interest rate, points, and the length of the lock.

What is the difference between a mortgage broker and a lender?

A mortgage broker counsels you on the loans available from different wholesalers, takes your application, and usually processes the loan which involves putting together the complete file of information about your transaction including the credit report, appraisal, verification of your employment and assets, and so on. When the file is complete, but sometimes sooner, the lender “underwrites” the loan, which means deciding whether or not you are an acceptable risk.

Will I save money going directly to a mortgage lender?

Not necessarily. In fact, if you are a reasonably astute shopper, you will probably do better dealing with a mortgage broker. Mortgage brokers do not add any net cost to the lending process, because they perform functions that would otherwise be done by employees of the lender. Furthermore, because mortgage brokers deal with multiple lenders — in a typical case, 25 to 30, sometimes more — they can shop for the best terms available on any given day. In addition, they can find the lenders who specialize in various market niches that many other lenders avoid, such as loans to applicants with poor credit ratings, loans to borrowers who do not intend to occupy the property, loans with minimal or no down payment, and so on.

What is a full documented loan?

Both income and assets are disclosed and verified, and income is used in determining the applicant’s ability to repay the mortgage. Formal verification requires the borrower’s employer to verify employment and the borrower’s bank to verify deposits. Alternative documentation, designed to save time, accepts copies of the borrower’s original bank statements, W-2s and paycheck stubs.

What are the other types of loans?

  • Stated income/verified assets: Income is disclosed and the source of the income is verified, but the amount is not verified. Assets are verified, and must meet an adequacy standard such as, for example, 6 months of stated income and 2 months of expected monthly housing expense.
  • Stated income/stated assets: Both income and assets are disclosed but not verified. However, the source of the borrower’s income is verified.
  • No ratio: Income is disclosed and verified but not used in qualifying the borrower. The standard rule that the borrower’s housing expense cannot exceed some specified percent of income, is ignored. Assets are disclosed and verified.
  • No income: Income is not disclosed, but assets are disclosed and verified, and must meet an adequacy standard.
  • Stated Assets or No asset verification: Assets are disclosed but not verified, income is disclosed, verified and used to qualify the applicant.
  • No asset: Assets are not disclosed, but income is disclosed, verified and used to qualify the applicant.
  • No income/no assets: Neither income nor assets are disclosed.

What is a good faith estimate?

It is the list of settlement charges that the lender is obliged to provide the borrower within three business days of receiving the loan application.

What are points?

It is an upfront cash payment required by the lender as part of the charge for the loan, expressed as a percent of the loan amount; e.g., “2 points” means a charge equal to 2% of the loan balance.

What is a pre-qualification?

This is the process of determining whether a customer has enough cash and sufficient income to meet the qualification requirements set by the lender on a requested loan. A pre-qualification is subject to verification of the information provided by the applicant. A pre-qualification is short of approval because it does not take account of the credit history of the borrower.

How Much Home Can I Afford?

First Name*   
Last Name*   
Email*   
Phone*   
Question or Comment
Enter the Captcha
Reload
Online Status
Online Lead Source

Message From Our Owners

Why we love building homes in Utah


Don, Dave and Ron share why they love building new homes for Utah families. Hear their story of starting McArthur Homes and what makes us different from other builders.

View Now »

Behind the Scenes

a closer look at construction


McArthur Homes does many things to build a safer, healthier and stronger home for you and your family. VP of Construction, John Gassman, takes you on a tour behind the scenes to see how we do it.

View Now »

Our Communities

Change your lifestyle in one of our great communities.

View Our Communities

Design My Home

Find Your Community, House Plan, and Then, Design Your Home

Design

Schedule a Tour

Schedule a tour at any of our beautiful new home communities!

Schedule Now

Ask a McArthur

Let's Talk Today

We’re here to answer any question or concern you may have. Our process is an open book and we’re happy to share it with you. Click here to talk to a McArthur representative and ask away!